Malt - Grains - Hops

Malt Extracts

Liquid Malt Extracts
Fermentable sugar
Malted barley is the principal source of fermentable sugar, color and flavor in beer.

Typical Malt Extracts are thick Viscous syrups that result from the concentration of the water extract of enzymatic hydrolyase of malted barley.  This extract (or syrup) is basically a solution of about 20% water and about 80 % carbohydrate and its shelf life attributes are dependant on the nature of the product and its processing.

Malt extract, meeting typical specifications, is a very stable food product.  It's solids, PH, acidity, viscosity and low water activity ensure that this unique food and brewing product, when properly processed, has a long stability period under a variety of conditions.  Non-Diastatic material is processed and treated to higher temperatures and is generally pasteurized.  Diastatic material is, by it's very nature, processed at lower temperatures in order to maintain the active diastatic enzyme and as such has perhaps somewhat shorter shelf life than it's non-diastatic partner.

The barley grain contains the starch that is converted into sugar by the enzymes that are created during the "malting" process. Malting is the process of steeping raw barley in warm water over several days to encourage the grain to "sprout" its acrospire. The growth is then stopped by heating and drying the grain. At this point the malted barley contains the enzymes necessary for the creation of sugar. The next step will be to "mash" the grains.

To "mash" malted barley we first crack it open to expose the starch on the interior. We then mix it with warm water, creating a porridge-like gruel, which is allowed to sit for an hour or more. During this time the starch is being converted into several different types of fermentable and non-fermentable sugar. After the mashing period, the grains are rinsed in hot water and the clear liquid extract that we obtain is the basis of the "malt extract" that you will be using in the brewing process.

Pale Brewer's Malt Extract

Pale Brewer's Malt Extract is a concentrated Brewer's Wort of 100% Malted Barley and is processed in accordance with good manufacturing practice under strict quality control and sanitary conditions.  All of UCM's products comply with all relevant requirements of the Canadian and U.S. Food and Drug Acts and regulations.

Pale Brewer's Malt extract is ideally suited for light to medium bodied lagers and ales of a straw yellow to pale amber gold colour.  This material has a low Diastatic activity so that brewer's can utilize the processing aspects of this enzymatic activity.  This is a very pale, very fermentable extract. This means that it will have a relatively high alcohol yield, and it will leave a dry, smooth flavor and light straw color in the beer.

Specifications:

Total Solids
80.0 % To 82.0% (R.S.TC - % Brix Solids
PH (10% w/v)
5.3 + - 0.4
Acidity  (mg NaOH)
160 - 240
Protein
5.8 % + - 1.1%
Ash
0.8 % to 1.7 %
Colour (initial Production)
4.5 + - 1.5 EBC Lovibond
Fermentability
min. 78 % to 81 %
Carbohydrate Profile  (expressed as % DWB)
Fructose
1.0 - 2.0 %
Maltotriose
4.0 - 11.5 %
Glucose
6.0 - 12%
Dextrins
2.0 - 10 %
Sucrose
< 1.0 %
Oleomargarines
18.0 - 29 %
Maltose
38.0 - 47.0 %

Amber Brewer's Malt Extract

Amber Brewer's Malt Extract is an extract of 100% Malted Barley and is processed in accordance with good manufacturing practice under strict quality control and sanitary conditions.  All of UCM's products comply with all relevant requirements of the Canadian and U.S. Food and Drug Acts and regulations.

Amber is a full bodied golden extract that leaves a pronounced malty, slightly sweet flavor in the beer. It is slightly darker than the light lager and, if used in abundance, leaves a pronounced malty or caramel-like aroma in the beer.  amber is ideally suited for medium to full bodied ales of a copper to light brown colour.

Specifications:

Total Solids
80.0 % To 82.0% (R.S.TC - % Brix Solids
PH (10% w/v)
5.3 + - 0.4
Acidity  (mg NaOH)
100 to 200
Protein
75 % to 78 %
Ash
1.0 % to 2%
Colour (initial Production)
8.0 to 12.0 Lovibond (EBC0
Fermentability
78 % to 81 %

Dark Brewer's Malt Extract

Amber Brewer's Malt Extract is an extract of 100% Malted Barley and is processed in accordance with good manufacturing practice under strict quality control and sanitary conditions.  All of UCM's products comply with all relevant requirements of the Canadian and U.S. Food and Drug Acts and regulations.

As the name implies, this is a dark brown extract which, if used as the sole fermentable extract in a beer, will provide a color and consistency similar to Newcastle Brown Ale or beers of that style. It is the least fermentable of the extracts, and thus provides more body and malt flavor than the other two. Dark malt is naturally colured

Specifications:

Total Solids
80.0 % To 82.0% (R.S.TC - % Brix Solids
PH (10% w/v)
5.3 + - 0.4
Acidity  (mg NaOH)
160 to 240
Protein
5.0 % to 6.0 %
Ash
0.8 % to 1.7 %
Colour (initial Production)
38.0 to 48 % Lovibond (EBC)
Fermentability
78 % to 81 %


Black Brewer's Malt Extract

Black Brewer's Malt Extract is an extract of 100% Malted Barley and is processed in accordance with good manufacturing practice under strict quality control and sanitary conditions.  All of UCM's products comply with all relevant requirements of the Canadian and U.S. Food and Drug Acts and regulations.

A very dark malt extract made from 10% pale malt barley and 90% black malt barley. This extract produces rich, full bodied, dry stouts when used exclusively. It can be blended with various other malts to produce beers with a predominant bitter roasted flavor.  This product has little or no fermentability.

Total Solids
68.0 % To 72.0% (R.S.TC - % Brix Solids
PH (10% w/v)
4.1 + - 0.2
Acidity  (mg NaOH)
30 to 20
Protein
4.5 + - 1.0 %
Ash
0.5 % to 1.5 %
Colour (0.125% w/v)
18.0 to 26 deg Lovibond (EBC)
Fermentability
not applicable

 
DME Dried Malt Extract

Pale Dried Brewer' Malt Extract (DME) is a vacum dried extract of malted barley and is processed in accordance with good manufacturing practice under strict quality control and sanitary conditions.  All of UCM's products comply with all relevant requirements of the Canadian and U.S. Food and Drug Acts and regulations.

DME, when used in conjunction with other malt extracts, is ideally suited for increasing malt flavour and body in a wide range of beer styles.  DME comes in two grades pale and dark.

Moisture
5% max.
PH (10% w/v)
5.5 + - 0.5
Protein
5.0  to 7.8%
Colour (initial Production)
6.0 to 8.0 deg Lovibond (EBC)
Fermentability
70 to 75 %


Glucose and Sugars


Glucose/Corn Syrup – syrup made from corn starch; used for its sweetness, texture and color

United Canadian malt supplies  several types of Brewer's Glucose products at BYO Breweries our main glucose is the HiMalt Glucose 1530 other products can be ordered.

Essential Properties
HiMalt Glucose
90055-1530
HiMalt Glucose
90065-1630
HiMalt Glucose
90060-CS43
Apperance, Taste
Clear Liquid
Viscous
Sweet, Bland
Clear Liquid
Viscous
Sweet, Bland
Clear Liquid
Viscous
Sweet, Bland
Dry Substance %
80.0 - 82.0
81.0 - 82.7
79.9 - 81.9
Dextrose Equivalent (D.E.)
55
62
45
Baume. Comm.
43
SO2 ppm/ %
<10ppm
<10ppm
<40ppm
Conversion Type
Enzyme-enzyme
Enzyme-enzyme
Acid-enzyme
Apparent Starch
Viscosity @ 32 (cps)
22,000
Carbohydrate Profile % (dwb)
Typical Composition (+ - 3%)
Dextrose
8
27
9
Maltose
56
45
43
Malto-triose
16
10
18
Higher Saccharides
20
18
30

Dextrose
Dextrose – sugar derived from starch; used for its light sweetness, texture, bulking and color; dextrose is used in a variety of food and confectionery applications as well as for making solutions for intravenous injections


Honey
Honey, 18°L
intense, sweet honeyish aroma & flavour
superb for improving/increasing aroma and colour of darker beers without introducing astringent roast flavours
good for giving low-alcohol beers flavour & aroma that they might otherwise lack
enough diastatic power that, if carefully mashed, will self-convert (but amounts of no more than 50% recommended, given its intensity)
mashing produces fermentables, but extract brewers can steep for flavour & aroma



Grains

Colour ratings (°L) are approximate. Every effort has been taken to ensure their accuracy, but malt batches vary.


PALE MALTS

dried completely after malting, then kilned at relatively low temperature
base malt for brewing all-grain beers: must be mashed
high in enzymes (6-row higher than 2-row, North American 2-row higher than European 2-row)
In beers with little specialty malt, European grains provide more complex palate and rounder flavour—very useful when trying to duplicate European styles
all varieties are well modified

6-Row ; 1.8°L
higher in enzymes than 2-row, making it useful with low-enzyme adjuncts; intended for high-adjunct American beers
grainy flavour, rather than malty
more husk than 2-row, so could be better for mashing with huskless grain (like wheat)
high in protein, which can lead to increased trub as well as haze problems in finished beer
many brewers feel 2-row is mellower

2-Row; 2°L
good 'all-purpose' malt for brewing in a variety of styles


WHEAT MALTS
huskless, so must be mashed with properly milled barley malt to avoid stuck run-off; a sparging aid such as oat hulls (see section 9, below) may be advisable
grainy flavour; lighter flavour than barley malt
more enzymes than barley malt, but slower to convert
some beer styles (weizen, weiss, &c.) are made with large amounts of wheat malt (30–70%)
high in protein, so beer with high percentage of wheat is likely to have a haze
when used in small amounts (3–5 %), assists with head formation & retention
mashing produces fermentables, but extract brewers can steep for flavour & aroma

Wheat; 2.5°L
darker colour & heavier flavour than continental wheat malt; ideal for North American wheat beers
less modified than continental wheat

HIGH-KILNED MALTS
similar production to pale malts, but kilned at higher temperatures, giving deeper colour and more intense flavours & aromas
retain sufficient enzymes to convert themselves but no adjuncts
most can be used as malt in a recipe
when used in conjunction with pale malt, even small quantities (10%) will increase flavour & complexity
mashing produces fermentables, but extract brewers can steep for flavour & aroma

Munich; 6–6.6ºL
higher diastatic power than US Munich (below), making it more suitable than US Munich for the production of beers that use large amounts of Munich malt (85% or more)
gives deep colour and rich, full malt character
use: Munich & Vienna lagers, bock (essential)



CRYSTAL MALTS
produced by kilning damp, freshly malted barley at relatively high temperatures; during this process the starches first convert to sugars and then caramelize
no diastatic power
extensive colour range
contributes variety of flavours (see below), increases body, improves head formation & retention
no mashing required; ideal for extract brewers

Crystal, medium (Hugh Baird—UK); 60°L
a good choice if you don't know which crystal malt to use
contributes medium caramel flavour & colour, increased sweetness, some toffee character


ROASTED MALTS AND GRAINS
produced by roasting pale malt (except roast barley, which is unmalted)
no diastatic power
in pale beers, darker varieties can be used in small quantities (25–50 grams / 23 litres) to give hint of brown/red to beer and to increase complexity of background flavours
no mashing required; ideal for extract brewers

Roast barley; 300°L
because it is unmalted, has a dry, sharp, bitter flavour with no sweetness
distinct black colour, rather than brown-red of chocolate and black malts
essential in stout; small amount ok in porter

Chocolate; 475°L
gives dark beers smooth, toasted, nutty flavour; possesses some sweetness
has a redder colour than other dark-roasted malts
essential in porter, brown ale, mild; ok in stout

Black, aka black patent; 525°L
intense carbonized, burnt caramel, biscuity, woody flavour; intense aroma
can be used in porter, stout
best used for colour, rather than flavour, in amounts of 1 to 3%

ADJUNCT GRAINS

Flaked maize, aka flaked corn; 0.5°L
grainy sweetness
source of fermentable sugars, but contributes little flavour, colour, or aroma; must be mashed
used in large amounts to lighten the body and flavour in some beer styles (mainly North American lager)
nitrogen diluent, so use of even small quantities will help prevent chill haze

Flaked rice; 0.5°L
neutral flavour: allows malt flavour to come through while giving beer crisp, dry character
source of fermentable sugars, but contributes little if any flavour, colour, or aroma; must be mashed
used in large amounts to lighten the body and flavour in some beer styles (mainly North American lager)

Flaked barley; 2.2°L
smooth, grainy flavour contributes little flavour, colour, or aroma
can be steeped for use in extract brews
produces tight, long-lasting head, increases body


 
Hops

The hops used in the brewing industry are grown principally in Washington and Oregon in the U.S., B.C. in Canada, and parts of Czechoslovakia, Germany, and the U.K..They grow on a vine and take the shape of a cone (similar in appearance to a pine cone, but green). They are processed into pellets at the hop farms, and it is in this form that they are easiest to use. As with grapes, there are numerous varieties of hops and each of them is capable of lending a specific flavor, aroma, and bitterness to a beer. We use up to 12 varieties in the formulation of our beer recipes. Many more are available for specific specialty brews. Hops are principally responsible for a beers unique aroma. Their bitterness level is measured in "alpha acid units". The alpha acid, when boiled with the malt, is what produces the bitter flavor of a beer. Hops that are not boiled, or are boiled for a very short period of time contribute very little bitterness but a great deal of aroma. This is why we generally add hops in two, or even three stages during the boil: at the beginning for bitterness and flavor, and towards the end for aroma. Although most beer consumers shy away from the word "bitterness" instinctively, a certain amount of bitterness is necessary in all beers to counteract the sweetness of the malt. A beer is said to be well-balanced when the malt and hops are "married" to such a degree that neither the sweetness of the malt nor the bitterness of the hops predominate in the flavor of the beer.
 

 
Hop Variety
Bittering/
Finishing
% alpha acid
% beta acid
Aroma
Typical usages
Substitutes
Bramling Cross
Finishing
5.5 - 7
2.3 - 3.2
Fruity, Lemony
Traditional ales
Unknown
* Bullion
Bittering
5.5 - 8.5
2.9 - 4.5
Neutral, not highly regarded
English Ales & Heavy German Lagers
N. Brewer
Galena
Centennial
Bittering
9.5 - 11.5
3.4 - 4.6
Med.- floral smooth bitter
Pale ales and Wheat Beers
Cascade
Chinook
Bittering
11.5 - 14.3
3 - 4.2
Mild - med heavy spicy, bitter
Ales and Lagers
Galena
Nugget
Cluster
* Cluster
Bittering
5.2 - 8.6
4.4 - 5.8
Smooth - neutral, med. spicy
good base bittering hop for any beer
Galena
Chinook
* Cascade
Bittering
4.4 - 7.2
4.2 - 7.1
Mild - floralslightly spicy, perhaps "citrus-y"
Amber ales, can be used as a bittering hop
English Goldings
* Fuggles
Both
4.5 - 5.5
2.5 - 3
Mild and pleasant
English Style Ales, IPA's, Porter's
English Goldings
Galena
Bittering
12 - 14
7 - 9
Medium with a pleasant taste
Great Bittering Hop, will suit all style's of beer
Cluster
Nugget
* English Goldings (Kent)
Both
4 - 6
2 - 3.5
Mild, pleasant and slightly flowery
Used for all English Style ales and Porter's
Fuggles
Green Bullet
Bittering
10 - 13
6.2 - 7
Medium pleasant
Dual Purpose
Unknown
* Hallertau
Both
3.5 - 4.5
3.5 - 4.5
Mild, pleasant and slightly flowery
German Lagers and Ales
Mt. Hood
Mount Hood
Finishing
5 - 7.5
5 - 7.5
Mild and pleasant
American and german Lagers
Unknown
* Northern Brewer
Bittering
8 - 10
3 - 5
Medium to strong
German Lagers and Ales
Perle
Hallertau
Nugget
Bittering
12 - 14
4 - 6
Heavy and herbalin style
A good bittering hop when boiled longer.
Galena
Cluster
* Perle
Bittering
7 - 9.5
4 - 5
Pleasant and slightly spicy
Very good in all style's of Ale's and Lager's
N. Brewer
Cluster
Galena
Pride of Ringwood
Bittering
9 - 11
5 - 6.5
Very mild (organic)
Australian Lagers and Ale's
Galena
* Sazz
Finishing
3 - 4
3 - 4.1
Mild and smooth
European Pilsners
Hallertau
* Sticklbract
Bittering
11 - 13
7 - 8
Medium
Lager's and Ale's
Unknown
* Tettnanger
Finishing
3.5 - 5.5
3 - 5
Mild, pleasant, slightly spicy
European Lager's and Ale's
Sazz
* Willamette
Finishing
4 - 6.2
3 - 4.1
Mild Pleasant, slightly spicy
English Ale's, Porter's and Stouts
Fuggles
English Goldings

Notes:
* are the varieties that we carry in stock at all times  others can be ordered in.
Alph and beta acid % are typical ranges encountered
Typical Usages and Substitutions are suggestions only.  If substituting, take into account the alpha acid content and adjust accordingly.